38654-enz

Building on spec

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Most houses in colonial times were built by individual builders or small building companies for clients or on speculation. In Wellington, the builder Harry Crump constructed 156 houses in the suburbs of Mount Cook and Newtown between 1892 and 1908. They included these five, all the same design ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
40181-enz

Tūtānekai playing his flute

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

This carving in Rotorua city centre shows the renowned Te Arawa ancestor Tūtānekai playing a flute. It reflects one leisure pursuit of young Māori, that of trying to woo their sweethearts. Tūtānekai often played his kōauau, and his compositions lured his beloved Hinemoa to swim across Lake ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Carving of Tawhaki

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

This poupou (carved figure), Te Puna Wai Mātauranga (the wellspring of knowledge), stands outside the University of Waikato library in Hamilton. It represents Tāwhaki who, along with his brother Karihi, was guided by their blind kuia (grandmother), Whaitiri. In many traditions kaumātua were ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
P-7198-enz

At the cove

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

This beach on Auckland’s North Shore has proved fruitful for beachcomber Tricia Hollingum and her son Sam. Some beaches attract all manner of floating detritus, while others remain relatively clean.

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
P7660enz

Kaitāia war memorial

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Kaitāia’s war memorial was erected in 1916, halfway through the First World War, when local dismay at the high New Zealand casualty rate was beginning to take hold. Part of the inscription reads: ‘In loving memory and in honour of our sons and ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
P2430enz

Tangaroa, god of the sea

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

This sculpture by Jason Porter, ‘Te autahi ki te ākau’ (one ocean current), is a modern representation of the god of the sea, Tangaroa and his children. It stands at one of the entrances to Pāpāmoa Beach, Bay of Plenty.

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
P3704enz

Alpacas in the Waikato

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Since the 1970s there has been diversification into new forms of farming such as deer, goats and alpacas. Alpacas are, like llamas, members of the South American camelid family. They are farmed for their beautifully soft wool, and shorn once a year. In 2004...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
P3706enz

Kiwifruit orchard, Bay of Plenty

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Since 1975 there has been diversification into fruit exports, the most important being been apples and kiwifruit. The centre of the kiwifruit expansion was the Bay of Plenty, especially Te Puke. This orchard is shown just before the 2004 harvest.

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
P3708enz

Wairākei geothermal power station

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

About half of New Zealand’s energy is derived from oil, much of which is imported. But there are some distinctive sources of electric power. This includes a major contribution of hydroelectric power derived especially from South Island rivers, some ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
P3710enz

Huntly power station

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

New Zealand has considerable reserves of coal, some of which is mined near Huntly in the Waikato. A neighbouring power station, pictured here, draws primarily on coal to generate power. Sited on the banks of the Waikato River, it was commissioned in 1983, ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
P7613enz

Pine forest

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

From the 1920s, exotic species of trees were planted as production forests, and radiata pine became the main crop. By 2003, there were 173,646 hectares of production forest in Northland. Most of the harvested timber and processed wood products were exported...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
P7831enz

Kaikohe main street

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Kaikohe is the service and administrative centre for the Far North. Originally a small Ngāpuhi settlement, it grew steadily after a rail link south was established in 1914. Now farming is the major economic activity in the district.

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
P7861enz

Kūmara capital

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

The principal centre of kūmara (sweet potato) production in New Zealand, Dargaville calls itself the country’s ‘kūmara capital’.

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
P7691enz

Mangōnui courthouse

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

The Mangōnui courthouse is one of a number of historic buildings in the township that have been preserved. Mangōnui began as a whalers’ settlement in the early 19th century and became a busy trading port during the kauri-logging days. Now it is a ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
P7659enz

An ancient anchor

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

When French explorer Jean François Marie de Surville sailed around the top of Northland in 1769, he lost three anchors. One is now in the national museum, Te Papa Tongarewa, and this one is in Kaitāia’s Far North Regional Museum.

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
P7657enz

Welcome sign, Kaitāia

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Kaitāia’s rich Māori, Dalmatian and European heritage is evident in this welcome sign on the outskirts of the town. Founded through cooperation between Māori and Europeans, the settlement expanded rapidly between 1870 and 1900 when kauri-gum ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Vineyard near Kaitāia

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Kaitāia’s economy depends on farming, harvesting exotic forest, and horticultural enterprises including fruitgrowing and viticulture. Okahu Estate, established in 1984, is one of New Zealand’s most northern vineyards.

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Whāngārei today

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Whāngārei is a prosperous city with a museum, library, performing arts centre and other amenities. It is the major centre for Northland, attracting young people in search of work, and tourists setting out to explore the region.

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
P9465enz

Manawatū Gorge entrance

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

At the western (Manawatū) entrance to the Manawatū Gorge the river is less than 100 metres above sea level. It is only 50 kilometres from the coast as the crow flies, but its course is twice that length.

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
P9436enz

Maintaining the gorge road

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

The steep terrain of the Manawatū Gorge makes for many earth slips and road closures in wet weather. These workmen are installing protective barriers above the road. Windmills of the Te Āpiti wind farm mark the skyline.

Ministry for Culture and Heritage