P17649enz

Kiwifruit vines

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

These vines are laden with kiwifruit. New Zealand’s kiwifruit industry has grown spectacularly since the 1970s. Researchers have developed new fruit varieties and improved growing techniques. Although New Zealand kiwifruit producers now have to compete ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
P17604enz

Champion Flourmills, Timaru

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

South Canterbury and North Otago have been important grain-growing regions since the 1870s. This mill was built in Timaru in 1882 to turn locally grown wheat into flour. The grain was lifted to the top of the building and was then fed into a series of ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
P17725enz

Kiwifruit Country – Te Puke

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Te Puke in the Bay of Plenty calls itself the kiwifruit capital of the world – and has the sign to prove it. Most of New Zealand’s kiwifruit is produced in and around the area.

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
P7516enz

Whāngārei Quarry Gardens

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

The Whāngārei Quarry Gardens contain subtropical plants that would struggle to grow in most other parts of New Zealand. Species such as this cycad flourish, thanks to a combination of mild climate and high rainfall.

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
Broken

Organic juice

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Organic juice is bottled at the Foxton Fizz plant in Foxton. Coral Tree Organic Products of Levin produces apple cider vinegar and many fruit juices.

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
P9446enz

Easton monument

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Frederick Spencer Easton took a share in the Moutoa flax estate in 1902, and it helped make him one of Manawatū’s wealthiest businessmen. The son of a butcher and Foxton benefactor, Augustus Easton, Frederick was known as the ‘Moutoa millionaire’. ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
P7613enz

Pine forest

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

From the 1920s, exotic species of trees were planted as production forests, and radiata pine became the main crop. By 2003, there were 173,646 hectares of production forest in Northland. Most of the harvested timber and processed wood products were exported...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
P7622enz

Portland cement works

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Portland cement works at Whāngārei has a specialised loading port. This is just one of a number of port facilities on Whāngārei Harbour which deal with a variety of cargoes.

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
P7827enz

Māori businesses, Moerewa

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Economic hardship from the 1980s forced the people of Moerewa to consider creative community development initiatives. He Iwi Kotahi Tatou Trust was formed to provide youth training and social services, and under its auspices a number of Māori-owned ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
P7831enz

Kaikohe main street

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Kaikohe is the service and administrative centre for the Far North. Originally a small Ngāpuhi settlement, it grew steadily after a rail link south was established in 1914. Now farming is the major economic activity in the district.

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
P7816enz

Kawakawa

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Freight trains once ran through the main street of Kawakawa, when coal was transported from nearby mines to the port of Ōpua. The main activity in the district is now farming.

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
P7817enz

Kawakawa public toilets

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

The main tourist attraction in Kawakawa is the colourful public toilet designed by Austrian artist Friedensreich Hundertwasser. First visiting New Zealand in the 1970s for an exhibition of his work, he decided to make the country his second home and bought ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
P7818enz

A view from the loo

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Inside the women’s toilets, designed by Hundertwasser, there are colourful and eccentric details, including tiles, bottle insets, coloured glass and ceramics.

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
P7859enz

Dargaville, 2003

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

The broad sweep of the Wairoa River defines the town of Dargaville and was a reason for the town’s establishment in 1872. Navigable for many miles, the river provided a route into the kauri forests of Northland, and a means of transporting logs to the ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
P7861enz

Kūmara capital

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

The principal centre of kūmara (sweet potato) production in New Zealand, Dargaville calls itself the country’s ‘kūmara capital’.

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
P7871enz

Whāngārei today

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Whāngārei is a prosperous city with a museum, library, performing arts centre and other amenities. It is the major centre for Northland, attracting young people in search of work, and tourists setting out to explore the region.

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
P7880enz

Tutukākā marina

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Tutukākā is one of the many settlements along the coast from Bream Head to the Bay of Islands. It is a centre for big-game fishing, and divers depart from Tutukākā to explore the artificial reefs created by the sunken frigates Waikato and Tui. The marina provides berths for ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
P7891enz

Waipū House of Memories

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

The Waipū House of Memories contains many relics of Waipū’s Scottish heritage. The settlement was founded by Scottish immigrants from Nova Scotia under the leadership of the dour but charismatic preacher Norman McLeod, who exerted a strict control over ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
P11309enz

Downlands and hills

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Behind the Tengawai River valley, near Pleasant Point, lie the snow-capped peaks of the Hunters Hills. They are part of the interior ranges that separate the Mackenzie Basin from the coastal downlands and plains.

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
P11333enz

Memorial to James Mackenzie

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

In 1855 the shepherd James ‘Jock’ Mackenzie was caught inland from Fairlie with 1,000 sheep from the Levels station. He protested his innocence, but was jailed. He escaped twice before being pardoned. His exploits, and those of his dog, won him ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage