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Te Matapihi

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Te Matapihi, a Māori cultural group based in Kaiwhaiki, on the Whanganui River not far from Whanganui city, rehearses a haka for the 2002 national Māori performing arts festival.

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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South Westland cattle drive, 1951

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

The Nolan brothers had the Cascade cattle run south of Jacksons Bay in South Westland. This 1951 video shows them sorting out sale cattle, which were then driven to the saleyards at Whataroa, 270 kilometres north.

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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First topdressing trials

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

The first aerial topdressing trials were made at Ōhakea in 1948. A New Zealand Air Force Avenger torpedo bomber was fitted with a reserve petrol tank modified to carry and release fertiliser. Trays were laid on the ground to measure the rate and spread of the fertiliser. Conclusions were so ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Managing soil erosion

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

W. L. Newnham, chair of the Soil and Rivers Control Council from 1942 until 1957, talks about the impact of farming and bush clearance on millions of acres of the New Zealand landscape. One of the solutions he proposes is to plant trees to prevent soil erosion on steep hill country.

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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School on the radio

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

The Correspondence School, set up as a distance-teaching institution for country children, began broadcasting some lessons on the radio in 1937. These children are listening to the end-of-year session in 1960. Correspondence School radio broadcasts ceased in 1997.

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Goat culling

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Because of the damage that feral goats do to native vegetation, they are periodically culled. Hunters must be fit and skilful, and accurate shots over long distances. These hunters are shooting goats in Marlborough, in 1946.

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Chicken sexing

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

It is necessary to sex chickens to sort out the future female, egg laying hens – which will form the basis of the flock – from the male cockerels, which will be removed. It is a specialised and skilled job. This video, taken in 1954 during a poultry course at Massey College, shows how...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Hop picking

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Watch footage of families picking hops in Nelson in 1944.

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Border dyke irrigation system

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Watch 1990 footage explaining how a border dyke irrigation system on the Canterbury Plains works.

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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One hundred crowded years

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

In 1940 the Government Film Studios made a film to commemorate the centennial of the signing of the Treaty of Waitangi, and the first century of New Zealand as a nation. The film featured this highly romanticised footage of the heroic struggles of the pioneer family. The man cuts down the bush to...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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First Golden Shears

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

The first Golden Shears competition was held in Masterton in 1961. It featured a close final between the two Bowen brothers, Ivan and Godfrey. Watch Ivan win the championship.

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Trout hatchery

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Watch early 1950s footage of an acclimatisation society hatchery.

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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High country musterers

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

A team of musterers and their dogs set off into the South Island high country to gather in sheep. The men each have their ‘beat’, a specific area they will be working in.

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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National ploughing championships

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

The fourth national ploughing championships were held at Hastings in 1959. Stuart Allison from Milton, Otago, won the silver plough trophy, and went on to represent New Zealand at the world championships in Northern Ireland.

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Prime lamb

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

As this 1950 film shows, the expression ‘prime lamb’ began to be used even before health issues made its alternative, ‘fat lamb’, unacceptable. Both mean lamb in prime condition, ready for slaughter.

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Family farm, 1949

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

This film clip of Jim Page and his family at work on their farm in Golden Bay in 1949, shows a fairly typical scene in the post-war years, especially in dairy areas. The medium-sized family farm became the norm as smallholdings were combined and larger estates continued to be broken up.

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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EXPO 1970

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Watch footage of the New Zealand pavilion at the 1970 Expo (an international trade fair) held in Osaka Japan. By 1970 the tax system had become increasingly complicated with various incentives introduced. For example the 1962 budget had allowed export manufacturers to deduct 150% of expenditure ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Savile Cup polo final

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Morrinsville beat Cambridge 5–4 in the final of the Savile Cup at Feilding in 1949. Polo involves four players on each side, and in this match they played eight chukkas (periods), with each rider using four horses. In 2008 it was more usual to have six chukkas.

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Chimp tea party

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

This film clip shows members of the public watching three young female chimpanzees having a tea party at Wellington Zoo in 1956. The chimpanzees had been purchased from London Zoo in time for Wellington Zoo’s 50th anniversary. The last chimpanzee tea party in Wellington Zoo was in 1970.

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Ice-skating rink

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

In addition to providing urban people with open green spaces for recreation, some parks also contained amenities designed to entertain. In 1966 an ice skating rink was opened in Queenstown Gardens, providing locals and visitors with another form of winter fun.

Ministry for Culture and Heritage