No filters selected

Narrow your search results by selecting the filters below.

Filter by

Broken

Te Papa's list of Fijian ferns and lycophytes

Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa

These are the taxonomic names in use by Te Papa for Fiji's indigenous and adventive (indicated by *) ferns and lycophytes. Authored by Patrick Brownsey and <A href="mailto:leonp@tepapa.govt.nz">Leon Perrie</A>. (c) Te Papa. Updated 10 July 2012. This list is based on o...

Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa
Broken

Seals

Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa

There are three species of Otariid or eared seal that are found in New Zealand waters: the New Zealand sealion Phocarctos hookeri , the New Zealand furseal Arctocephalus forsteri and the subantarctic furseal Arctocephalus tropicalis . By far the most commonly encountered is the New Zealand fursea...

Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa
Broken

Mollusc publications

Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa

<SPAN>Studies are published in a wide range of local and international scientific journals, trade magazines, and reports.<SPAN> </SPAN>These are used for resource management (e.g. fisheries), Department of Conservation (DoC), education, (field guides and books), and are a basic...

Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa
Broken

Highlights from the Pacific Cultures Collection

Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa

The Pacific Collection has been shaped by changing institutional and curatorial priorities, which have in turn been influenced by the history of New Zealand as a Pacific nation, the roles that New Zealanders have played in the Pacific islands, and the migration of Pacific peoples to New Zealand i...

Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa
Broken

Samoan tatau (tattooing)

Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa

The most important Samoan tatau (tattoo) for men is the pe'a – dense tattooing which completely covers the lower body from waist to knee. Malu is the equivalent tattoo for women, and covers the leg from the upper thigh to behind the knee, but is not as dense as the pe'a. There is a stru...

Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa
Broken

The first navigators

Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa

The first people to explore the Pacific Ocean did so without any scientific instruments. They navigated using complex systems of knowledge about the stars, winds, and the movement of the ocean. They also knew how certain cloud formations and sea birds indicated that land was near. These explorers...

Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa
Broken

Tapa from Papua New Guinea

Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa

Papua New Guinea is one of the most culturally diverse countries in the world, with over 800 languages and at least as many cultural groups. But only a few of these groups make tapa cloth. Read about how tapa are made and used in Papua New Guinea here: <A href="http://collections.tepapa....

Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa
Broken

Tapa from the Solomon Islands

Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa

The very diverse island cultural groups that make up the Solomon Islands create different kinds of tapa, for different uses. Read about how tapa are made and used in the Solomon Islands here: <A href="http://collections.tepapa.govt.nz/theme.aspx?irn=1948"> Tapa: Pacific Style - So...

Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa
Broken

Little blue penguin (Eudyptula minor) or korora

Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa

Blue penguins are the smallest penguins in the world. These little guys weigh about one kilogram. Compare that with the biggest emperor penguins – weighing in at some thirty kilograms! Australia is the headquarters for these birds which are known there as ‘fairy penguins'. They are quite a t...

Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa
Broken

The early tourist market in the Pacific Islands

Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa

There was a trade in Pacific artefacts from the time the first Europeans arrived in the Pacific. But in the late 1800s, as travellers began to visit the Pacific region, a new tourist market emerged. Pacific people made items specially for this market – items they had always made, others they had ...

Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa
Broken

`ei

Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa

An 'ei is a necklace made from yellow shells called pupu. The 'ei pupu' (shell leis) are made up from small yellow or reddish-brown snail shells found under rocks or leaves, especially after rain. They are boiled to clean them or just soaked for several days to clean them out. Some...

Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa
Broken

Ocean Beach specimens

Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa

Plants of the Ocean Beach area.

Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa
Broken

Onoke Spit specimens

Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa

Plants of the Onoke Spit area.

Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa
Broken

Samoan Kilikiti (cricket)

Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa

With summer comes the sport of kilikiti, a form of cricket, played Samoan style. Kilikiti said to have been introduced to Samoa in the nineteenth century by visiting sailors and missionaries, is a major summer sport for Samoans. In Samoan kilikiti each team has two wicket keepers, and numbers can...

Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa
Broken

Surveyor’s chain

Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa

The differences between Maori culture and European culture were perhaps most marked in perceptions of land ownership and boundaries. For Maori tribes, mana whenua, or the right to land, was acquired through either inheritance or conquest. Specific natural features defined territory. Alliances and...

Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa
Broken

‘Ie toga (fine mat)

Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa

This is a very old and rare ‘ie toga (fine mat) from Samoa. On important occasions, high ranking matai (chiefs) and taupou (daughters of chiefs) may have worn it as a garment, but it has also been presented as a valuable in ceremonies that cement relationships between people. <STRONG>The ma...

Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa
Broken

Britannia – the town that never was

Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa

The suburb of Petone now sits on a site where the New Zealand Company tried unsuccessfully to found a settlement with the grand name of Britannia. The Company's survey ship, Cuba, cast anchor just off what is now known as the Petone foreshore on 4 January 1840. Aboard were a number of passen...

Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa
Broken

Cook Islands vaka - Tauhunu and A‘ua‘u

Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa

This vaka (canoe) is one of two from atolls in the Cook Islands that feature in Tangata o le Moana. They were both made about 1900 and were exhibited at the New Zealand International Exhibition of Arts and Industries, held in Christchurch in 1906. Both are extremely rare in the world today. <...

Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa
Broken

Disease on board nineteenth-century passenger ships

Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa

Ill health was a problem aboard the immigrant ships of the nineteenth century, particularly among working-class passengers. They lived below deck in the steerage area, where it was dark, damp, cramped, and often crawling with vermin. During the 1859 passage of the Zealandia one passenger wrote, ‘...

Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa
Broken

T-shirts as canvases

Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa

This T-shirt was made by Siliga Setoga of PopoHardWear. Using a mock dictionary format, he has come up with a historically accurate yet humorous definition for the term ‘freshy'. <STRONG>Freshy and fob</STRONG> ‘Freshy' and ‘fob' are derogatory terms used to describe ne...

Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa