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Shearing methods used on ewes in Canterbury, 1992

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

It is often believed that the advent of machine shearing meant the end of blade shearing, but, as this interview with Graham Jones shows, there are still many gangs of blade shearers. The table of shearing methods used in Canterbury indicates that over a ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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James Little’s memoirs

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Listen to a reading of James Little’s memoirs about breeding and exhibiting Corriedale sheep. Little successfully experimented with crossing Merinos with Lincoln or Leicester sheep from the 1870s. He promoted the inbred halfbred, as they were called at ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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The language of mustering

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Sheep mustering on horseback with dogs in the South Island high country has led to a wide range of terms to describe the work, clothing and lifestyle. Listen to John Gordon discussing the colourful language of mustering. Sound file from

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Radio journalists at work

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

John Scott worked for a time for the ‘rurals team’, which produced radio programmes on agricultural topics for nearly 40 years from the late 1950s. Listen to Scott’s recollections of learning the job, at a time when his New Zealand accent ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Thomas Broun, 1838–1919

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

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Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Formation of Crown research institutes

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

On July 1, 1992, 10 Crown research institutes were formed – the most radical reorganisation of government science in New Zealand’s history. The aim was to group scientists into institutes with separate research aims and subject areas. They also provided...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Annabelle White

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Annabelle White (second from left), cookbook author and media personality, poses with the winners of a gourmet competition at Plum City near Havelock North, Hawke’s Bay. Listen to her description of Hawke’s Bay stone fruit attractions. Soundfile ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Thresher

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Threshing machines were used in New Zealand for more than 80 years, finally declining in use in the mid-1940s. Forerunners of combine harvesters, they separated the grain of crops such as wheat and oats. Listen to Jack Perkins in his radio show ‘From the...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Kūmara whakapapa

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

This kūmara whakapapa (genealogy) shows how kūmara is descended from Rongo-māui and Pani-tinaku. Listen to an extract from Pō! Pō!, a waiata (song) by Enoka Te Pakaru, which refers to the origin of the kūmara. It translates into English as: Pō! Pō! My son, Tama...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Recording the countryside

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Nevile Lodge’s cartoon of Jim Henderson with a microphone in hand appeared in the book version of ‘Open country’. ‘Open country’ was a regular radio show in the 1950s and 1960s, which broadcast short stories from rural New Zealand. The sound file ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Cardigan Bay

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Along with Phar Lap, Cardigan Bay is one of New Zealand’s most famous racehorses. Cardigan Bay was a Standardbred harness racer. In harness racing the horse pulls a two-wheeled cart, or sulky, which seats the driver. Cardigan Bay lived from 1956 to 1988, ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Chico the cockatoo

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Although there is now a population of wild sulphur-crested cockatoos, they were originally brought to New Zealand as caged birds and some, such as Chico, are tethered pets. Chico perched on owner Robert Nelson’s shoulder while he cycled around Lower Hutt ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Eastern rosella

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

The eastern rosella has a distinctive red head, which contrasts with its yellow underbelly, and its blue and green wings and tail. Rosellas are often seen in pairs or in small flocks. Sound file from the ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Little owl

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Originally introduced from Germany, little owls are now established in the South Island. They are found mainly in flat pastoral country, especially on the east coast, while the native morepork is found more commonly on the west coast.

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Kookaburra

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

This Australian kookaburra looks at home perching on another Australian import – a eucalyptus tree. Sound file from the Department of Conservation.

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Nesting white-backed magpies

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Magpies were introduced from Australia. They normally nest in exotic trees, like this pair in a pine. They are found throughout the North Island and in most parts of the South Island, except Central Otago and the northern and southern tips of the West Coast. They have entered the national ...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Rooks

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Rooks have a fierce beak and glossy feathers. The rook is the only member of the crow family in New Zealand, as the two endemic New Zealand ravens are now extinct. Sound file from the Department of Conservation

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Male and female blackbirds

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Although blackbirds are probably New Zealand’s most widespread bird, not many people know that only the male (top) is actually black. It also has a distinctive orange beak. The female blackbird (bottom) is brown with a variegated underside. She builds the...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Song thrush feeding chicks

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Song thrushes are common in all parts of New Zealand, except native bush. They lay their eggs in the spring and often raise up to three broods a season, but rarely in the same nest. The young nestlings are fed by both the male and female, and usually fledge...

Ministry for Culture and Heritage
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Mynah

Ministry for Culture and Heritage

The aggressive mynah was introduced to New Zealand from Asia. Its colouring is very distinctive – it has a black head, yellow beak and patch around the eye, and a cinnamon-brown body.

Ministry for Culture and Heritage